School Library Research: Literacy and transliteracy

School Library Research (ISSN: 2165-1019) is the scholarly refereed research journal of the American Association of School Librarians. The purpose of School Library Research (SLR) is to promote and publish high quality original research concerning the management, implementation, and evaluation of school library programs. The journal will also emphasize research on instructional theory, teaching methods, and critical issues relevant to school libraries and school librarians.

SLR seeks to distribute major research findings worldwide through both electronic publication and linkages to substantive documents on the Internet. The primary audience for SLR includes academic scholars, school librarians, instructional specialists and other educators who strive to provide a constructive learning environment for all students and teachers. For more information and publishing from School Library Research, visit www.ala.org/aasl/slr.
 
The following includes a listing of research published in SLR with a focus on teaching and learning literacy and transliteracy skills. New research will be added as it becomes available.
______________________________________________
 
School Library Research, Vol. 14 (2011)
Study findings are related to the extent to which students valued information literacy practices and the factors involved in determining whether students were likely to transfer information literacy practices across time and school subjects.
 
School Library Research, Vol. 14 (2011)
Becoming lifelong learners in a world in which information flows freely and defies the boundaries of traditional disciplines and subject areas, children and youth in particular must develop strategies for engaging with ideas that transcend the curriculum and its usual topics and structures. The I-LEARN Model—Identify, Locate, Evaluate, Apply, Reflect, kNow—describes the process of learning with information.
 
School Library Research, Vol. 14 (2011)
In this naturalistic study, informants indicated a variety of information-seeking styles and interests, engaged in information seeking to facilitate maturation into adolescence, and recounted diverse information-seeking episodes. All experienced a ―point of passion, and ―anchor relationships helped foster their intrinsic motivation for information seeking. Topic interest and relevance, group work, task choice, creating a final product, and fewer time constraints were all components of the students’ intrinsically motivating information-seeking episodes.
 
School Library Research, Vol. 12 (2009)
The purpose of this study was to examine books that support transitional readers to determine the representation of people of color. The findings were analyzed using critical race theory (CRT), a theoretical framework that places race at the center of educational research and discourse. The results indicate that despite the increasing ethnic and racial diversity in the United States, children of color are rare in transitional books. Even rarer are authors of color.
 
School Library Research, Vol. 12 (2009)
This article investigates the contributions of perceived competence in information and digital literacy skills, perceived competence in reading, the disposition to read for enjoyment, and the disposition of curiosity, towards actual performance in an information and digital literacy skills knowledge test. Study participants included more than twelve hundred eighth grade students from twenty states.
 
School Library Research, Vol. 11 (2009)
This study is phase two of the Barnstable Study of a Web-based high school summer reading program that replaced traditional summer reading lists. It focuses on low-achieving students who had a low participation rate in the first two years of the program.
 
School Library Research, Vol. 11 (2009)
The information literacy skill levels of high school and college graduates continue to vary considerably. This report compares findings across a subset of data collected in three independent research studies focusing on students’ conceptions and perceptions of how they have learned what they know about information literacy. A majority of students reported that they were largely self-taught, but some also reported having received instruction from school library media specialists (SLMSs) and, to a lesser degree, public and academic librarians. Overall, low-performing students tended to identify peers as sources of knowledge while proficient students tended to identify SLMSs and teachers as sources of knowledge.